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Current Print >> 6 of 26:  1872

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For PRESIDENT HORACE GREELEY of NEW YORK and for VICEPRESIDENT BENJN. GRATZ. BROWN . . .

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An unusually elaborate and imaginative campaign banner for Liberal Republican-Democratic presidential candidate Horace Greeley. The print contrasts scenes of war and mayhem from Ulysses S. Grant's past as a Civil War general (right) to the world of letters, peace, and progress supposedly fostered by New York "Tribune editor Greeley (left).

Wearing his trademark white coat and spectacles, Greeley appears in the foreground of a crowded urban scene, where newsboys--black and white--hawk the "Tribune," an orator preaches from a pulpit, and Indians, Irishmen, and a range of other peoples mingle. Smoking factory chimneys, churches, and telegraph wires stretch into the distance. Liberty or Columbia, accompanied by an American eagle, hovers above the city holding a laurel crown.

At the top of the print is a bust portrait of George Washington, flanked by medallions of the seal of the United States. On either side fly streamers with the seals of the states. Below, in the center of the picture, are streamers with Democratic mottoes "Universal Amnesty, Liberty, Equality, Fraternity and Impartial Suffrage." Below that appear the words "The Pen is mightier than the Sword" with a crossed pen and sword. The saying "Be it Peace! And the Sword Has to Cease" which appears below this slogan is a play on Ulysses S. Grant's campaign slogan, "Let us have peace."

At lower left is a small bust portrait of Greeley, on the right one of his running mate Benjamin Gratz Brown, and in the center a portrait of Abraham Lincoln. On the ground near the Lincoln portrait are attributes of the editor--a valise, a pen, books, and a newspaper, and (on the right) those of the soldier Grant--cannon shot and a broken saber. Below are the words: "In The Beginning Was the Word Then Followed the War. Yet We Shall Seal the Peace."

In the lower margin is inscribed "No. 9. Original Composition."

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Current Print >> 6 of 26:  1872

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