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Current Print >> 48 of 74:  1852

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SOLICITING A VOTE.

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A cynical view of party competition for the working man's vote in the presidential campaign of 1852. In a polling place, four candidates struggle to force their own election ticket on a short, uncouth-looking character in a long coat. The latter holds a whip, suggesting that he is either a New York cabman or a farmer. The candidates are (left to right): Whig senator from Massachusetts Daniel Webster, Texas Democrat Sam Houston, Illinois Democrat Stephen A. Douglas, and Whig general Winfield Scott. The cartoon must have been produced before the June 5 nomination of dark-horse Franklin Pierce as the Democratic candidate, as Pierce is not shown.

Webster: "My honest friend, these men are interested parties, I have no further interest in this matter myself, than the inclination to 'Serve my beloved Country,' My Family cannot subsist on less than 25,000 {dollar} a year." His comment may refer to his own personal financial straits or to the nepotism involved in securing his son Fletcher's lucrative appointment as surveyor of the Port of Boston in 1850.

Scott (in uniform, grasping the man's coat): "My good Friend, allow me to present you this Ticket, I am 'Old Genl. Scott' you know me, I licked the British & the Mexicans, if elected I shall probably lick all Europe."

Houston: "This is the 'Ticket' for you, my good friend, I am 'Old Sam Houston' if elected I shall not only 'lick all of Europe,' but all 'Creation' to boot." Douglas (his arms around the man): "There, there, go away, go away, don't worry the man, leave him to me, leave him to me."

Affixed to the wall at right are two posters or signs marked "DEMT." and "WHIG." In the left background stands Henry Clay leaning against a chair observing the scene, along with President Millard Fillmore who looks in through a window.

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Current Print >> 48 of 74:  1852

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